From Beirut To Jerusalem From Beirut To Jerusalem

Tennis court / sport project

You and The Other on each side of the box. You must play within it, you must play outside of it. Rely on you and only you. You do not have a team to fall back on. One skill outdoing the other. One mind outlasting the other. Your rhythm is yours and for the other to take. Your temper is yours and for the other to agitate. The toss of comes from your tips. Embrace that control. The swing of your stringed savior comes from your power. Embrace that control. Eat away at the edges of the box. Attack its corners. But stay long enough to see the other beat, collapesed beneath the rubble, as you take that triumph with you to the grave.



Tennis Ball

Flushing Meadows New York and the rest of the East Coast may have drowned under the heavy rains of Irene, but it hasn’t stopped the high fever of every tennis fanatic across the globe. The US Open still lives! To our surprise, the last tournament of the year saw every game, set, and match fall perfectly into place (besides Sabine Lisicki’s delayed match), today being the first day of the two week slam. There is no better way to end the year than a tournament like Flushing Meadows, where the atmosphere purges the players’ remaining heap of will onto the court for one last time. Arthur Ashe stadium is the biggest tennis stadium in the world and has the craziest fanatics to back up that grandiosity. We can all agree that the US Open is probably the most unorthodox slam of the big four because the spectators frankly don’t give a shit. They talk during the point, they aren’t afraid to let you know how they feel, and it is always a party in New York regardless of traditional tennis etiquette. The bustle of the city carries into the court. Pressure. Emotions. Chaos. Chaos. Chaos. Some players buckle because of it. Others thrive on it. It is a ride, an inevitable rush. Andre Agassi says that you have to be able to embrace it to find victory. 



Arafat & I A comedy about Marwan, a Palestinian in love, and Lisa, the girl he’s going to marry. He thinks everything about her is perfect - she was even born on the same day as Chairman Arafat! But how will he make Lisa understand the significance of this coincidence?” - Toronto Palestine Film Festival via Youtube



2081 "Based on the short story "Harrison Bergeron" by celebrated author Kurt Vonnegut, "2081" depicts a dystopian future in which, thanks to the 212th Amendment to the Constitution and the unceasing vigilance of the United States Handicapper General, everyone is "finally equal…." The strong wear weights, the beautiful wear masks and the intelligent wear earpieces that fire off loud noises to keep them from taking unfair advantage of their brains. It is a poetic tale of triumph and tragedy about a broken family, a brutal government, and an act of defiance that changes everything.Featuring an original score performed by the world-renowned Kronos Quartet (Requiem for a Dream) and narration by Academy Award Nominee Patricia Clarkson (Far From Heaven, Goodnight and Good Luck), "2081" stars James Cosmo (Braveheart, Trainspotting), Julie Hagerty (Airplane!, What About Bob?) and Armie Hammer (The Social Network)"

(Source: vimeo.com)



St Vincent

St. Vincent

surgeon // st. vincent by sexmusic

Annie Clark is releasing her new album in September and I’m really excited about that, especially because this song is pretty sick. I think that this song is very St. Vincent, not only because you can distinguish her in a sea of gems the moment the song starts, but because she does something pretty epic with the musical composition. And she does this consistently, always. I do enjoy the sound of her voice, but St. Vincent is truly artistic because she is an amazing composer. She can shred on the guitar with this kind of cool confident absent-minded passion, and the sounds she makes with it changes the limit of creativity we have when we think of what a guitar is and what it does in music. Just listen to the chorus of this song. You can hear a fluttering of plucked notes stringed together in a constant wave, rising and falling, in a pattern that always sounds new. 



The Story of Abdi Dadle

The story of Abdi Dadle

In reminder of the Horn of Africa Crisis, I decided to share this photo and accompanying story by Michal Przedlacki. I came across these stunning pair of hands while I was surfing flickr, and it dawned on me that these kind of crises occur in this region almost all the time. But as the recent drought and famine has become the biggest humanitarian crisis the world has faced, it seems that these already pre-existing humanitarian crises are barely emerging from the dark. And even in my past few months of mental absence from the world, it seemed that as I got back into my regular routine, superficial media had barely remembered to scrape the surface of it. Anyway, here is the story of Abdi Dadle:

"I see him from a distance. He squats in a huge and shallow hole holding his spade. Its earthen walls are whitish. It’s salt. What I see in front of me is its mine. There are hundreds, or maybe thousands of them scattered here, men and children digging holes into which they pour saline water and let it dry to leave back salt. They wait for 14 days and then collect it. They sell kilogram for 8 cents. Such is a way of their life. Such is a life here after loosing herds in droughts. His name is Abdi Dadle and he is 65 years old. It is nearly twenty more than the average life expectancy here. He is, or at least was, a Somali nomad. Eight years ago he lost his herd in one of recurring droughts. He was left with one old ox.  Working constantly and steadily, he’s got quite expressive body language. By extending his arms in front he explains the size of a field of salt. Raising and lowering them he depicts how he dug nearby well. It’s perfectly circular, with diameter of one meter. Its banks, but only it, is cracked like an old skin. Surrounding it lies flat and empty landscape. Spatial and devoid of shade. Vast. Nothing grows on it, not a single grass. And the well holds water. Salty as the sea one. His body is black and thin. Forearm veins writhe from under t-shirt arms, bend around the elbows to finish on his hands. His face is rich in wrinkles, similar to leaf with its beams. Cheeks, sunken from age have longitudinal scars, three on each side.  Muslim rosary hanging around his neck is made of thick, oval beads. As black as him. It moves across his chest, from left to right, and right to left as steadily as the Muslim prayer. He also allows to be observed. This dramatic, hard work of his. Thanks to it he survives, but dies of it as well. At one point, he clenches his hands into fists. Their interiors are white with salt, probably forever. Lttle drops of sweat come down from under his small, white fez, and flow into the mouth. He’s got orange teeth. Like his nails. Broken and old. Abandoned. There are hundreds, or maybe thousands of them scattered here, men and children digging holes into which they pour saline water and let it dry to leave back salt. They wait for 14 days and then collect it. They sell kilogram for 8 cents. Such is a way of their life. Such is a life here after loosing herds in droughts” Michal Przedlacki: Abdi Dadle’s hands, God Cusbo salt mine, Afder Zone, Somali Region, May 2010



The Weapon of Photography A Brazilian photographer reveals the humanity of those living in his country’s largest slum, provoking us to look deeper at the roots of the drug trade and urban violence.The sprawling slums of Brazil—known as favelas—are often portrayed as lawless havens populated by violent criminals. There are not many journalists or artists who have devoted their work to finding out what is actually happening within these marginalized spaces. Photographer Andre Cypriano is an exception. A native of Brazil, Cypriano has studied some of the world’s biggest slums, including the famous Rocinha shantytown in Rio de Janeiro. Armed with only his camera, he reveals the humanity of those who have made lives amid precarious circumstances. This short film follows the photographer into the favelas and shows Cypriano’s faith in the power of his medium. As the artist says, “Photography is a weapon; it’s transformative. It’s capable of things that real weapons cannot do.”” -CoR



When You’re At A Restaurant, Don’t Ask For Water If You’re Not Going To Drink It The New York Times has put together a slide show (here) title Fleeing Somalia’s Drought that depicts the severe drought and famine occurring in the Horn of Africa right now. There is a total of fourteen photos each with a caption that some of you might want to explore. Years of drought have practically eliminated the traditional nomadic pastoralist lifestyle in Somalia, consequently resulting in shortage of livestock and ultimately eliminating the primary means of subsistence for many groups of people. Thousands of people are fleeing to neighboring Kenya and Ethiopia where camps are overflowing with victims of the crisis. This is the first real (late) post I have made in a while just because I have been in summer session mode, and when that happens I disappear from the Earth. Even so, I never heard any of my colleagues speak once on this. My 60 year old professor constantly puts us down for having no real knowledge of anything important politically or pop-culturally, and he never once mentioned this crisis. No one in my distant household has mentioned it even though they watch television like its a life line. And the popular American media seems to thoroughly avoid the subject. And to top it off, the crisis first came to my attention on the most exaggerated news programs ever since Rupert Murdoch’s Fox News: the Spanish channel! And there was absolutely nothing exaggerated about it at all. I just feel that it is the saddest thing that in my absence from the real world this comes to me in another language. That’s typically not a problem for me, but I honestly feel that anyone who is that absent minded does not have to read the BBC or The Los Angeles Times or some piece of news in Dutch to hear about a crisis this big. It should come to anyone in flashing lights in popular media or at least through one of the many social networks. Tumblr would have been that one social network for me if I would have just signed on. 
There are many places and organizations to donate money, a resource I unfortunately do not have. I remember the graduating class before me in high school provided an alternate method of relief for a village in some part of Africa, I don’t remember where. Instead of donating money, where NGO’s and corrupt governments would pocket the money instead, the students got together to make sleeping nets to prevent mosquitoes carrying Malaria. This would reduce the number of people with Malaria in the village and would help them directly. This is the kind of aid that I would want to provide. Direct aid. Not money that might not actually go to the cause. The Red Cross has already been caught doing it. I would want to provide true resources, but is there an organization that runs like this? 

When You’re At A Restaurant, Don’t Ask For Water If You’re Not Going To Drink It The New York Times has put together a slide show (here) title Fleeing Somalia’s Drought that depicts the severe drought and famine occurring in the Horn of Africa right now. There is a total of fourteen photos each with a caption that some of you might want to explore. Years of drought have practically eliminated the traditional nomadic pastoralist lifestyle in Somalia, consequently resulting in shortage of livestock and ultimately eliminating the primary means of subsistence for many groups of people. Thousands of people are fleeing to neighboring Kenya and Ethiopia where camps are overflowing with victims of the crisis. This is the first real (late) post I have made in a while just because I have been in summer session mode, and when that happens I disappear from the Earth. Even so, I never heard any of my colleagues speak once on this. My 60 year old professor constantly puts us down for having no real knowledge of anything important politically or pop-culturally, and he never once mentioned this crisis. No one in my distant household has mentioned it even though they watch television like its a life line. And the popular American media seems to thoroughly avoid the subject. And to top it off, the crisis first came to my attention on the most exaggerated news programs ever since Rupert Murdoch’s Fox News: the Spanish channel! And there was absolutely nothing exaggerated about it at all. I just feel that it is the saddest thing that in my absence from the real world this comes to me in another language. That’s typically not a problem for me, but I honestly feel that anyone who is that absent minded does not have to read the BBC or The Los Angeles Times or some piece of news in Dutch to hear about a crisis this big. It should come to anyone in flashing lights in popular media or at least through one of the many social networks. Tumblr would have been that one social network for me if I would have just signed on. 

There are many places and organizations to donate money, a resource I unfortunately do not have. I remember the graduating class before me in high school provided an alternate method of relief for a village in some part of Africa, I don’t remember where. Instead of donating money, where NGO’s and corrupt governments would pocket the money instead, the students got together to make sleeping nets to prevent mosquitoes carrying Malaria. This would reduce the number of people with Malaria in the village and would help them directly. This is the kind of aid that I would want to provide. Direct aid. Not money that might not actually go to the cause. The Red Cross has already been caught doing it. I would want to provide true resources, but is there an organization that runs like this? 




Cecil Otter



Cecil Otter; Rebel Yellow by Paigetsuma
Cecil Otter is a member of the Doom Tree Collective. Last year I saw him perform and when it came to this song I felt like I was watching some kind of moving speech. He didn’t bounce around much, he just held the mic close to his chest and told a story. It was the one moment when we were all just standing there. All the lines were surprisingly clear maybe because we were actually trying to listen to the song. The opening lines are like the hook of a good article. You want to read the rest of it. And that is what I like about this song. It’s not a bunch of crazy cool lines bunched up together to make a crazy cool song. 

Dessa CD Release @ The Fine Line

Cecil Otter

Cecil Otter; Rebel Yellow by Paigetsuma

Cecil Otter is a member of the Doom Tree Collective. Last year I saw him perform and when it came to this song I felt like I was watching some kind of moving speech. He didn’t bounce around much, he just held the mic close to his chest and told a story. It was the one moment when we were all just standing there. All the lines were surprisingly clear maybe because we were actually trying to listen to the song. The opening lines are like the hook of a good article. You want to read the rest of it. And that is what I like about this song. It’s not a bunch of crazy cool lines bunched up together to make a crazy cool song. 



Céu



Ceu Vagarosa - Cangote by ratkedesign
Céu has released two albums and in both of them I have enjoyed every song. “Congote” is a song off of her most recent album Vagarosa. It’s characteristic of the album’s reggae sound and soundboard experimentation. Brazilian musician Curumin, an artist I had mentioned in a previous post, worked on this album with her. You can hear a lot of his genius in this track. What I love about Céu: her voice is the greatest of improv instruments. 

Céu

Ceu Vagarosa - Cangote by ratkedesign

Céu has released two albums and in both of them I have enjoyed every song. “Congote” is a song off of her most recent album Vagarosa. It’s characteristic of the album’s reggae sound and soundboard experimentation. Brazilian musician Curumin, an artist I had mentioned in a previous post, worked on this album with her. You can hear a lot of his genius in this track. What I love about Céu: her voice is the greatest of improv instruments. 



Waltz With Bashir "Director Ari Folman’s animated, quasi-documentary Waltz With Bashir follows the filmmaker’s emotional attempt to decipher the horrors that unfolded one night in September of 1982, when Christian militia members massacred more than 3,000 Palestinian refugees in the heart of Beirut as Israeli soldiers surrounded the area. Folman was one of those soldiers, but nearly 20 years after the fact, his memories of that night remain particularly hazy. After hearing an old friend recall a vivid nightmare in which he is pursued by 26 ferocious dogs, Folman and his friend conclude that the dream must somehow relate to that fateful mission during the first Lebanon War. When Folman realizes that his recollections regarding that period in his life seem to have somehow been wiped clean, he travels the world to interview old friends and fellow soldiers from the war. Later, as Folman’s memory begins to emerge in a series of surreal images, he begins to uncover a truth about himself that will haunt him for the rest of his days" -filmDIY



Scream To Let Your Voice Be Heard A good friend of mine shared this with me a while back. I though a lot of you might be interested. Her name is Salome and she is a Persian femcee. She has worked with Hich-Kas, one of Iran’s more known hip-hop groups (you can listen to them here). This song talks about injustices and war crimes committed on Gaza City. Her flow is pretty slick and she’s got an interesting voice. In case you don’t speak Farsi, the lyrics are in this video. Everyone should take a look.



A Microphone Is Better Than The Kalashnikov "In 1989, Public Enemy’s single ‘Fight the Power’ exploded onto American airways and quickly became one of the greatest songs of hip-hop history and a timeless resistance anthem. The single became a testimony of the ongoing struggle against racism, oppression, and exclusion. While many critics argue that the commercialization of rap has since severed the genre’s the political lifeline, new artists from around the world have carried on its subversive tradition. The Palestinian group Katibe 5, which appears in the Cultures of Resistance feature film, is but one example of this new generation in hip-hop. The members of Katibe 5 see their music as a continuation of Public Enemy’s legacy. The five members, now all in their 20s, have been making music together since their early teens. They grew up in Beirut’s Burj al-Barajneh refugee camp, where over 16,000 refugees reside in an area less than a square mile. The overcrowded camp, which Katibe 5 calls ‘a small prison,’ leaves many of its residents with little ambition or hope for the future. Relations between Palestinian and Lebanese communities are tense. As the Lebanese army continues to battle Palestinian militias, camp residents have been vilified. However, Katibe 5’s fans come from both communities, and their music strives to validate the experiences of their Palestinian fans and to change Lebanese perceptions of the camp’s residents. The group’s sound is an eclectic mix of American hip-hop, Arabic poetry, and political commentary. They say, ‘We are part of a revolution - a musical revolution. It’s happening here and all over the world. We’re the adverb. We come before the verb. We’re preparing people for action.’ The group adds, ‘We have a responsibility not just to reflect this life. We’re not just Palestinian refugees speaking about our problems, or our lives in the camps, because the problems we face are not only a Palestinian problem. All over the world there are people who are oppressed, people who are incarcerated, people who are suffering.’" - CoR



fromthesugarcanes:

Today I watched a documentary on the Zapatista rebellion. The strength  and resilience of the Zapatistas, particularly the Women of the movement is absolutely  admirable and inspirational. These women are the epitomes of  womenhood, motherhood, humanity, bravery and grace. The  beauty they bring to the struggle is palms-to-chest. I will forever be  on the side of those who raise fists, raise babies, and raise arms, all the while at the forefront of the struggle against injustice.

fromthesugarcanes:

Today I watched a documentary on the Zapatista rebellion. The strength and resilience of the Zapatistas, particularly the Women of the movement is absolutely admirable and inspirational. These women are the epitomes of womenhood, motherhood, humanity, bravery and grace. The beauty they bring to the struggle is palms-to-chest. I will forever be on the side of those who raise fists, raise babies, and raise arms, all the while at the forefront of the struggle against injustice.

(via fromthesugarcanes-deactivated20)



Jeff Buckley



Mojo Pin by Andrea…
Ageless, I’m There In Your Arms Jeff Buckley is one of my favorite artists. On this day in 1997, he died at the age of 30. “Grace,” released in 1994, was his first and only completed album, and its an album everyone should thumb through. His posthumous releases and live albums are just as great. I wish I had seen him live in my lifetime because he was a performance artist. He was not a studio artist; my favorite songs by him are live recordings. Today I want to celebrate his legacy. This track titled “Mojo Pin” profoundly defines Jeff Buckley as a musician. That voice can never be erased from your mind, and it will make you wonder, who is this mystery white boy? 

Jeff Buckley

Mojo Pin by Andrea…

Ageless, I’m There In Your Arms Jeff Buckley is one of my favorite artists. On this day in 1997, he died at the age of 30. “Grace,” released in 1994, was his first and only completed album, and its an album everyone should thumb through. His posthumous releases and live albums are just as great. I wish I had seen him live in my lifetime because he was a performance artist. He was not a studio artist; my favorite songs by him are live recordings. Today I want to celebrate his legacy. This track titled “Mojo Pin” profoundly defines Jeff Buckley as a musician. That voice can never be erased from your mind, and it will make you wonder, who is this mystery white boy?